North Coast CNPS

EVENTS 2016

Please watch for later additions on our Web site (www.northcoastcnps.org) or sign up for e-mail announcements (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). Evening programs are free, public programs on the second Wednesday of each month, September through May, at the Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Rd., Arcata. Refreshments at 7:00 p.m.; program at 7:30 p.m. For information or to suggest a speaker or topic contact Michael Kauffmann at 407-7686 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Outings are open to everyone, not just members. All levels of expertise, from beginners to experienced botanizers, are welcome. Address questions about physical ability requirements to the leader. Contact the leader so you can be informed of any changes.

January 13, Wednesday. " Demystifying manzanitas (Arctostaphylos): Understanding the dynamics of California's iconic shrubby 'rock star'" Dr. Michael Vasey is a botanist and coastal ecologist with a long-term passion for manzanitas (Arctostaphylos). As the centerpiece of his talk, Michael will introduce a new book, "A Field Guide to Manzanitas" (Backcountry Press), of which he is a co-author. Using beautiful and informative images by free-lance photographer Jeff Bisbee, figures, range maps, and profiles of each of 104 taxa, this book is intended for anyone with an interest in this fascinating genus. Mike will provide the backstory behind the creation of this book and share his deep knowledge of how and why Arctostaphylos has become such a quintessential "rock star" of the California flora. Copies of the book will be available for sale. He, Tom Parker, and Jon Keeley have done recent treatments of Arctostaphylos for the Flora of North America and Jepson Manual (2nd Edition).

February 10, Wednesday. "North Coast Chapter Rare Plant Projects and Volunteer Needs" with David Imper and Greg O’Connell. 7:30 p.m. Dave Imper will explore the needs of the Red Mountain Two-flowered Pea Preserve established by North Coast CNPS members on the northern border of the Lassics Wilderness including the establishment of the conservation easement and the monitoring and habitat maintenance that will be required for the foreseeable future. Dave hopes to engage CNPS volunteers, perhaps as an annual chapter fundraiser and project to work together in this area of unique serpentine soils that supports the only known population of Lathyrus biflorus. Greg O'Connell will describe the goals of the Big Lagoon Bog restoration project as well as the CNPS Rare Plant Treasure Hunt Program. **Shooting star and Slinkpod (Fetid Adder's Tongue) from our nursery will be for sale.**

February 27, Saturday. Dune Forest Exploration. (Revised itinerary) Two manzanitas and their hybrid, mosses, lichens, Menzies' Wallflower, and very cute miners' lettuces are all possible points of interest as we walk through dune forest and stretches of dramatic, open dunes from the Lanphere Dunes to Malel Dunes, where we will have shuttled cars. We will walk between 2 and 4 miles, some on open sand, some on forest trails. Bring lunch and water. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or arrange another place. Dress for being in the weather all day! Return late afternoon. For information call Carol 822-2015.

March 9, Wednesday. " California's Vast Habitats Seen through Wildflowers." Larry Ulrich began his career in photography, and while traveling and working with his wife and photographic partner, have been making a living with a camera since 1972. Larry and Donna's most recent books include Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest, and Beyond the Golden Gate: California's North Coast from Companion Press, and Big Sur to Big Basin: California's Dramatic Central Coast from Chronicle Books. They will present an overview of the many habitats in California followed by images of a variety of native plants through the seasons.

March 26, Saturday. 1:00-1:30 p.m. Native Plants in an Urban Garden in Arcata. See the native plants and the wildlife they harbor in the Arcata Community Center Native Plant and Wildlife Garden, a project of the North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society. Naturalist, gardener, and author Pete Haggard will be there to help you see and to answer questions. Walk from the Community Center up the path left of Healthsport, or walk down from 7th Street. 839-0307. This garden visit is part of the Humboldt Permaculture Guild's Seed and Plant Exchange.

March 27, Sunday. (Happy Easter!) Arcata City Trail Day Hike. The recently completed, northernmost section of the Humboldt Bay Trail is a paved trail from Arcata Skate Park on Sunset Ave to Samoa Blvd. Including the adjacent Shay Park, the 1.3 miles section passes three species of blackberries, at least three species of willows, four conifers, and (with a small detour) a population of the rare Howell's Miner's Lettuce (Montia howellii). We will document these and the common native and non-native plants we see along this unfamiliar path through familiar territory. Meet 9 a.m. at the Foster Ave. side of the new roundabout on Sunset Ave. near the skatepark. Park in the neighborhood nearby. We might do a shuttle to make the walk one way. We might add on Potawot Village or Arcata Marsh. Be prepared for weather and walking; bring your lunch and water. It helps to tell Carol you are coming (707-822-2015).

April 2, Saturday. Burnt Ranch and Grays Falls Day Trip. It's fawn lily time at Burnt Ranch Campground! Out east along Highway 299 we also should find other spring blooms like Indian Warrior and Checker Lily. We'll look for the minute, rare Howell's Montia in campsite #16. Then we'll then explore the varied habitats at Grays Falls Picnic Area, including the short trail down to the falls. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata), at 9:15 a.m. at the museum parking lot in Willow Creek, or about 10:00 at Burnt Ranch Campground. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water and clippers. (If the Himalaya blackberry is still bad, we can spend a few minutes reducing it.) Return late afternoon. It helps to know you are coming: Carol 822-2015. Rare Plant Treasure Hunt for Montia howellii. There are several occurrences of this tiny miners lettuce-like plant in the Burnt Ranch area. We’ll see if we can locate these populations while exploring the general area.

April 8, Friday. Wildflower Art at the Upstairs Gallery in Umpqua Bank, 1063 G St., Arcata. Wildflowers will be presented in diverse media and styles by more than 15 artists during April. The opening, during Arts Arcata, April 8, 6-9 p.m., will feature live music and wine. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the CNPS Transportation Fund to take school classes to the Wildflower Show. 498-5228.

April 9, Saturday. Plant Walk and Broom Pull on the Salmon River. Springtime plant appreciation followed by removal of one of the only remaining Scotch broom populations on the Salmon river. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans at 10 a.m. Contact Tanya Chapple for details: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council. April 13, Wednesday. "Continued Adventures Hiking and Botanizing in the Austrian and Italian Alps." Kjirsten Wayman, a local chemistry professor and aspiring botanist, spent the last year living in Austria and northern Italy. She hiked mountains and meadows of this region in the European Alps to explore the diversity of flora that lives there. The Alps are home to many plants and wildflowers, both familiar and unfamiliar to the California botanist. The diverse and abundant alpine flora found there is complimented by impressive and majestic landscapes that dominate these mountains. This photographic botanical exploration will highlight a selection of the interesting flora and spectacular landscapes of the Austrian and Italian Alps with only the enthusiasm a California botanist could share! April 16-24, Saturday through Sunday. Native Plant Week.

April 16, Saturday, 12:30-3:30 p.m. Native Plants in Yards and Forest. Join Carol Ralph, Pete Haggard, and Anna Bernard for a walk from the Community Center to Arcata Community Forest and back to see native plants in private landscapes and in a redwood forest. Besides identification, questions like "What IS a native plant?" "Why plant natives in your yard?" "How do you mimic in a yard a wild habitat?" will be considered. Hopefully, trillium will be blooming in the forest. The walk is about 3 miles on sidewalks and good paths, with about 250 ft. elevation gain. Call 826-7050 to register for this free trip sponsored by California Native Plant Society at Godwit Days, or register for Godwit Days at www.godwitdays.org

April 17, Sunday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Street-side Native Plant Garden Visit . See a one-year-old and a recently planted "street-side" native garden at the corner of Alliance and Spear in Arcata. Learn with Anna Bernard how native plants are low maintenance, drought tolerant, and add beauty and variety to a city corner. 826-7247.

April 19, Tuesday. 4:00-5:00 p.m. Native Plants in an Urban Garden in Arcata. See the native plants and the wildlife they harbor in the Arcata Community Center Native Plant & Wildlife Garden, a project of the North Coast Chapter of CNPS. Naturalist, gardener, and author Pete Haggard will be there to help you see and to answer questions. Walk from the Community Center up the path left of Healthsport, or walk down from 7th Street. 839-0307.

[April 22-23, Friday-Saturday. Ruby Van Deventer Wildflower Show. At the Del Norte County Fairgrounds, 421 Highway 101 North, Crescent City. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. For information call Maureen 487-0821. ]

April 23, Saturday. 10 a.m.-12 noon. Ferns by the Dunes, a plant walk. Ferns are distinctive and popular for the exotic texture they add to vegetation. Carol Ralph will introduce eight species of our common ferns in the easy setting at the riparian edge of the dunes and talk about some of the amazing aspects of fern life. Bring a hand lens if you have one. Meet at 10 a.m. at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata, and carpool to the Lanphere Dunes Unit of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife refuge. Co-sponsored by Friends of the Dunes. Please reserve your space by calling 707-444-1397.

April 23, Saturday. 2-4 p.m. Plants along the Bay: Hikshari Trail Plant Walk. Join us on the Hikshari Trail to learn about native and non-native plants. Hopefully some, like Blue-eyed Grass and the rare Humboldt Bay Owl's-clover, will be in bloom along this 3/4-mile, level section of the trail. Experienced interpreter and gardener, and Hikshari Volunteer Trail Steward Coordinator, Wanda Naylor will point out what is native and what is not and why we care. Meet at the Elk River Slough parking area at the end of Hilfiker St., Eureka. Rain or shine. Children welcome when accompanied by adults. For more information call 707-502-5793.

[April 23, Saturday. Donna Wildearth talks at Miller Farms Nursery, McKinleyville]

April 24. Sunday. 1-3 p.m. Wildflowers in a Hydesville Forest. A dappled, deciduous forest along a sparkling stream, sprinkled with springtime gems like trillium, fairybells, bleeding heart, and Solomon's plume, is only one treat on show by hosts Bill and Linda Shapeero in Hydesville. A shady, Grand Fir forest and sunny, pasture edges offer other habitats alive with flowers and fresh, green herbaceous plants and shrubs, almost all native. Paths are gentle but slightly rough. From 101 at the south end of Fortuna take the Highway 36 exit, go about 3 miles up to Hydesville, turn left at the church onto Rohnerville Rd., go about 1 mile, turn right onto Puddin Ln at the bottom of a gulch, follow signs and balloons to Shapeero. The ground may be damp. For information: 768-3287 or 822-2015

[April 24, Sunday. Sierra Club Hike Little Bald Hills]

April 29-30-May 1, Friday through Sunday. SPRING WILDFLOWER SHOW and NATIVE PLANT SALE at the Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Dr., Manila. An exciting, annual gathering of wildflowers (both native and non-native) and people who love them. The SHOW is open Friday 1-5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Find details on the web site. If you want to help, call Carol 822-2015 The NATIVE PLANT SALE is open Saturday and Sunday only, 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.. Hundreds of volunteer- and nursery-grown native plants, chosen by our experienced gardeners to be good additions to local yards. They will be on hand to help you choose and answer your questions. Plant sales help fund our chapter! Volunteer help is always needed, to help grow plants and to help at the sale in many capacities. Anna 826-7247.

April 30, Saturday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Dune wildflower walk at the Manila Community Center,part of the Spring Wildflower Show, led by a Friends of the Dunes docent. May 1, Sunday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Dune wildflower walk at the Manila Community Center,part of the Spring Wildflower Show, led by a Friends of the Dunes docent. May 7, Saturday. Rare Plant Treasure Hunt for Seaside Bittercress (Cardamine angulata) in the redwood forests of Redwood National and State Parks. Cardamine angulata was added to the inventory of rare plants just a few years ago. We’ll visit a few places between Orick and Crescent City to see if we can locate historical occurrences and possibly find new populations. For details contact Greg O'Connell at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 599-4887.

May 11, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m." Plant Exploring in the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument." Explorer, writer, and educator Michael Kauffmann will lead us on a journey into the Transverse Ranges of southern California to explore the world of what John Muir called the steepest mountains in which he ever hiked. Michael's explorations began because of a Bigcone Douglas-fir mapping and monitoring project he is leading in conjunction with California Native Plant Society, but these studies have lead him to many more discoveries--from one of the world's largest oaks to the most isolated grove of Sierra junipers in the world. Michael will take us on a photographic journey from the mountain tops to the river canyons across one of the nation's newest national monuments.

May 14, Saturday. Patrick's Point State Park Ivy Pull and Hike. CNPS and Sierra Club will join the State Park's monthly restoration work day to rescue a little portion of this precious State Park from the smothering English Ivy. We'll work 9 a.m.-12 noon, then eat our picnic lunches, then enjoy some hiking, flowers, Sitka Spruce forest, and spectacular views along one of the great trails. Maybe we'll find mist maidens and twayblade. Come for all or part. Meet at 8:30 at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or at 9 a.m. at the park. Check at the entrance station for the day's location. Admission free for volunteers. Dress for the weather; bring water, lunch, and (optional) work gloves and clippers. Questions about ivy pulling: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Questions about the hike: Carol 822-2015, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

May 14, Saturday. CANCELLED. Wildflower Walk in the Orleans area. Exact destination to be decided. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans at 10 a.m. Contact Tanya Chapple for details: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

May 15, Sunday. Schatz DemonstrationTree Farm Field Trip. This facility of Humboldt State University in Maple Creek offers a chance to explore in the low elevation mountains between the coast and Six Rivers National Forest. We will walk with the resident manager's wife along a 3-mile, out-and-back route where she has seen 40 species of flowers blooming (not all native). She will point out the forest management projects in progress. We will be in forest shade, woodland dapple, and meadow sun, including a creek. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or arrange another place. Dress for the weather; wear sturdy walking shoes; bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. It helps to know you are coming: Carol 822-2015.

June 4, Saturday. Moss Day in Arcata. This is your chance to learn to distinguish the components of the green, mossy blur in a redwood forest. Join experienced bryologist and teacher, and founding member of the CNPS Bryophyte Chapter, Paul Wilson from California State University Northridge, for a day in the redwood forest learning common mosses and maybe some uncommon too. We will walk about 2 miles in the Arcata Community Forest and probably sort our finds while we have lunch at a picnic table in Redwood Park. Meet at 9:00 a.m. in the parking lot in the park at the top of 14th St., Arcata Bring water, lunch, hand lens, and paper packets or envelopes. We will finish by 3 p.m. Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. June 4, Saturday. Jacoby Creek Forest Redwood Ecology Hike. Jacoby Creek Forest is normally closed to the public. This is a chance to visit the area and learn about its trees, plants, and wildlife with City forester Michael McDowall. Hikers should bring water, wear sturdy hiking shoes, be kprepared for a moderate hike with two stream crossings. Your feet will get wet! Meet at 11 a.m. in the parking lot behind City hall of 7th St. to carpool to the trailhead. Return at 3 p.m. Walk is limited to 30 people. To add your name to the list, or get more information call 707-822-8184 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

June 11, Saturday. Rare Plant Treasure Hunt: Pink-margined Monkeyflower (Erythranthe trinitiensis). Traveling beyond Horse Mountain (where we saw this monkeyflower last year) on Forest Highway 1 in Six Rivers National Forest we will check out known sites of this diminuitive monkeyflower at Grouse Mountain, White Rock Spring, and Cold Spring, to gain more habitat data and, hopefully, find plants on native, non-roaded substrate. At Cold Spring we will also look for the Mountain Lady's-slipper (Cypripedium montanum), which was seen there 20 years ago and possibly last year. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Be prepared with sturdy shoes or boots for short hikes off gravel roads. Bring lunch, water, hats, sunscreen, and plant detectors. Tell John what kind of vehicle you can bring, if any. John McRae at 707-441-3513. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In partnership with Six Rivers National Forest.

June 11, Saturday. Plant Walk and Weeding in the Trinity Alps at High Point Trailhead. Help remove invasive Dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria) from a wilderness trailhead and join ius for a ridge top walk to Rock Lake. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans at 9 a.m. Contact Tanya Chapple for details, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

June 17-19, Friday p.m.-Sunday. Grizzly Peak and Mount Ashland overnight and day hikes. Day hikes on these somewhat high elevation mountains (5,000-6,500 ft.) will find wildflowers whether the season is early or late. The basic plan is to drive to Ashland Friday afternoon, set up camp (site to be determined), hike Grizzly Peak Saturday, have a campfire meal that night, hike Grouse Gap (Mount Ashland) Sunday morning, and drive home that afternoon. Overnighting in a motel in Ashland would work too. If you are interested, tell Carol right now, to be notified as plans develop. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 822-2015

June 25. Rare Plant Treasure Hunt for salt marsh species in the Dead Mouse Marsh of Ryan Slough. Dead Mouse Marsh was created decades ago by breaching a dyke and allowing brackish water to tidally inundate this area. A salt marsh community has formed there, providing habitat for several rare species. We hope to locate populations of Pt. Reyes Bird's-beak (Chloropyron maritimum ssp. palustre), Western Sand-spurrey (Spergularia canadensis var. occidentalis), and Lyngbye's Sedge (Carex lyngbyei). We may also be able to detect post-bloom Humboldt Bay Owl's Clover (Castilleja ambigua var. humboldtiensis). For details contact Greg O'Connell at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 599-4887.

July 9, Saturday. Plant Walk and Weeding in the Marble Mountains at Norcross Trailhead. Help remove invasive plants from a wilderness trailhead and join us for a walk up Elk Creek. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans at 9 a.m. This destination might change. Contact Tanya Chapple for details, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council. Note: Camping at a Forest Service campground along the Salmon River after this event would be convenient for the Sunday hike out of Forks of Salmon.

July 10, Sunday. Champion Incense Cedar Hike, Salmon River Restoration Council will lead a hike about 4 miles round trip up Devil's Canyon, a tributary of the Little North Fork Salmon River, to re-measure the California and national champion Incense Cedar and enjoy the summer wildflowers. Bring warm clothes, rain gear, lots of water, lunch, sunscreen, and bug repellant. Meet at 9 a.m. at the Forks of Salmon Community Park, or at 9:30 a.m. 10.5 miles upriver at the intersection of Sawyers Bar Rd. and Little North Fork Rd. (FS40N51). For information contact Mel at 530-462-4665 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

July 23, Saturday. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Orchids in the Dunes. Orchids are a very diverse group, including quite dainty species. Join Carol Ralph to learn about five species of orchid that live in the Lanphere Dunes. Four might be blooming. Walk 1-2 miles, partly on soft sand. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) to carpool to the protected site. Co-sponsored by CNPS and Friends of the Dunes. Call 444-1397 to RSVP.

July 30, Saturday. Rare Plant Treasure Hunt for Wolf's Evening Primrose (Oenothera wolfii) in roadside locations around Humboldt Bay and Trinidad. Oenothera wolfii struggles to survive due to road maintenance activities and hybridization with a similar non-native species. We’ll attempt to map locations of Oenothera wolfii and its hybrids. For details contact Greg O'Connell at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 599-4887.

August 1, Monday. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center Native Plant and Wildlife Garden tour. Do you want to see native plants growing and flowering in a local garden for free? Watch pollinators feeding at flowers and hundreds of native bees nesting in the ground? Find drought-and gopher-tolerant plants that have been growing in this garden since 1999? It is all happening now at the ACCNPWG located immediately west of HealthSPORT in Arcata. You can visit the garden any time, or, if you would like to get a more in-depth look, meet Pete Haggard Monday, Aug. 1, at 12:30 p.m. in front of the Arcata Community Center (312 Community Park Way) for a tour of the garden. For more information on the garden, go to http://northcoastcnps.org (under the menu, click on Arcata Community Center Native Plant and Wildlife Garden. To contact Pete Haggard, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call (707)839-0307 .

August 5-7, Saturday-Sunday. Del Norte Weekend. From coastal bluffs and wetlands to serpentine ridges, botanical wonders are in every direction in Del Norte County. On this weekend, from headquarters in Rock Creek Ranch, a group-camping facility run by the Smith River Alliance on the South Fork Smith River, some people will head out rare plant treasure hunting, while other people head for trail hikes. Rare plant hunters will explore the Gasquet region (and possibly Lake Earl area) looking for several late-blooming taxa with historical records from the areas, including Little-leaf Huckleberry (Vaccinium scoparium), Great Burnett (Sanguisorba officinalis), and several sedge species (Carex spp.) For rare plant details contact Greg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 599-4887. For camping and hiking contact Carol at 822-2015 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Come for all or part. Please tell us now if you are thinking of coming.

September 14, Wednesday. 7:30-9:00 p.m. “Hazelnut Speaks of the Wiyot Past.” Adam Canter, a biologist with the Wiyot Tribe, will share a story of re-discovery. The unique hazelnut scrub vegetation type was recently documented on Table Bluff. Hazelnut does not often grow on the immediate coast; The Manual of California Vegetation notes that it occurs in isolated, disjunct populations in San Mateo, Marin, and southern Sonoma Counties. Recently the Wiyot Tribe documented hazelnut scrub in Humboldt County, extending its known range by ~200 miles into the North Coast. Adam will highlight Wiyot history in relation to hazelnut, research into herbarium records which have shed light on the possible past distribution of this vegetation type, and share other important food plants the Wiyot Tribe cultivated. Current ethnobotanical research efforts are helping us better understand how California’s indigenous population managed, tended, and helped contribute to the diversity of species we see today. In the absence of Wiyot land management, some of these habitats are struggling to survive against forest encroachment, invasive species, and development.

September 24, Saturday. Native Plant Sale at the chapter’s nursery, 2182 Old Arcata Rd., on Kokte Ranch of the Jacoby Creek Land Trust in Bayside. Members pre-sale 9:00-10:00 a.m.; public 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 826-0259. Thousands of plants of about 130 species. Create your California landscape with native trees, shrubs, and grass for structure and bulbs, perennials, and annuals for color and cover. Experienced gardeners will help you choose.

September 25, Sunday. Cold Spring Day Hike. Only one hour away from Arcata, in Six Rivers National Forest along Forest Highway 1 (Titlow Hill Rd off 299) we will be breathing mountain air and gazing at mountain vistas. The Cold Spring area offers diverse habitats--White Fir forest, oak woodland, azalea thicket, open meadow, rocky outcrop, and sunny seep. Both Jeffrey and Ponderosa Pines grow there, and at least five species of mycoheterotrophs (a.k.a. saprophytes). Cattle also graze there. We will assess their impact. We will walk two to three miles on cow paths and cross country. Meet at 9 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for the weather (at 4,800 ft elevation); bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. It helps to know you are coming: Carol 822-2015.

October 12, Wednesday, 7:30-9:00 p.m. “The Natural History, Botanical Splendor, and Conservation of Mendocino Pygmy Cypress Woodland: A Rare Geobotanical Phenomenon.” Gordon Leppig, with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, will take us to one of the rarest and most threatened natural communities in California. The Mendocino Pygmy Cypress Woodlands are endemic to a narrow coastal strip in Mendocino County. Shaped by geological uplift of the land, strange soil conditions and hydrology have resulted in stunted trees, habitats for many rare and endemic plants, and a sensitive natural community found nowhere else. Despite its rarity, fascinating natural history, and high conservation value, Pygmy Cypress Woodlands face numerous threats. CNPS, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and others, are working to better understand, describe, and map this natural community as a means to further its conservation. Gordon will focus his presentation on the underlying natural history, botanical splendor, and efforts to better understand and conserve this unique natural community.

October 23, Sunday. Crothers Cove Day Hike. Why hike this short trail in Prairie Creek State Park? Because we never have! And there’s a small lagoon at the bottom. Even small wetlands can hold botanical treasure, and short trails can pass interesting plants. This trail goes over the ridge from the road to the beach, less than 2 miles round trip. Meet at 9 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for the weather, including the beach; bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. It helps to know you are coming: Carol 822-2015.

November 5, Saturday. Groves Prairie Field Trip. Unusual in our rugged mountains, Groves Prairie is a fairly level meadow, at 4,000 ft elevation, surrounded by Douglas-fir forest, some of it old growth. We last visited it 7 years ago, before it served as a fire camp (which hopefully will not be necessary in 2016). Will the Grape Fern be in the meadow, the Kneeling Angelica in the stream, the two species of yampah in the wet meadow, the Trillium-leaved Sorrel by the little bridge? Will the four species of gooseberries and currants have fruits? We will walk one to two miles in and around the meadow to answer these questions, some of it on a trail. Groves Prairie is two hours away in Six Rivers National Forest, up Forest Service roads north out of Willow Creek. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for the weather (Remember, it is higher elevation) and off-trail walking; bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. It helps to know you are coming: Carol 822-2015.

November 9, Wednesday, 7:30-9:00 p.m. “Fabulous Plants and Stories from the East Bay.” Heath Bartosh, Rare Plant Committee Chair for the East Bay Chapter CNPS and a Research Associate at the University and Jepson Herbaria will present a photographic tour through some of the East Bay’s richest botanical hot spots. He will reflect on colorful botanical personalities of the past and present, identify public lands and trails to enjoy the diversity of plant life, and discuss current conservation issues that put our botanical treasures of the East Bay at risk. Alameda and Contra Costa counties are at a point of botanical convergence due to geographic regions such as the San Francisco Bay, the North and South Coast Ranges, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, and the San Joaquin Valley meeting here. This unique geology provides conditions for diversity of native plants and Heath’s photographs will take us on a journey to these exceptional areas.

December 14, 7:30 p.m. Evening program. Join us for an informal evening sharing photos, artifacts, readings, or food relating to native plants and their habitats. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to sign up to present!

EVENTS 2015

Please watch for later additions on our Web site (www.northcoastcnps.org) or sign up for e-mail announcements (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Evening programs are free, public programs on the second Wednesday of each month, September through May, at the Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Rd., Arcata. Refreshments at 7:00 p.m.; program at 7:30 p.m. For information or to suggest a speaker or topic contact Michael Kauffmann at 407-7686 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Outings are open to everyone, not just members. All levels of expertise, from beginners to experienced botanizers, are welcome. Address questions about physical ability requirements to the leader. Contact the leader so you can be informed of any changes.

January 14, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

" Delving into the Cryptic Lives of Gall Wasps" with Dr. John DeMartini. Wasps of the family Cynipidae form galls on a variety of plants, particularly Rosaceae (rose) and Fagaceae (oaks) in northern California. John’s presentation will illustrate the interesting natural history of the wasp’s relationship to native plants by illustrating life cycles, galls sites, and predatory interactions. Dr. DeMartini is a Humboldt State University Professor emeritus with a passion for regional natural history.

February 11, Wed. 7:30 p.m. "Making It How It Was: Dune and Salt Marsh Restoration around Humboldt Bay"

Andrea Pickart of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge will evaluate the 25-year history of dune restoration on our coast, especially projects at Lanphere and at Ma-le'l Dunes. She will also discuss the research and monitoring being done to address the challenges of sea level rise associated with climate change. Michael Cipra, executive director of the North Coast Regional Land Trust, will share the inspiring results of his organization's five-year-old project to restore a 35-acre tidal wetland at Freshwater Farms Reserve. The project created a diverse salt marsh as well as estuary habitat for juvenile Coho and Chinook Salmon, Cutthroat and Steelhead Trout, and the endangered Tidewater Goby. A second phase of salt marsh restoration is being planned.

February 28, Saturday.

Requa to Lagoon Creek Day Hike (Coastal Trail, Hidden Beach Section, in Redwood National Park). We have found spring happening on this trail in February in previous years. See the March 2010 issue of Darlingtonia for a write-up of our most recent trip here.(It's on our web site.) Osoberry, Red-flowering Currant, Western Coltsfoot, Candyflower, Milkmaids, Smith's Fairy Bells, Western Trillium and Giant Purple Trillium (Trillium ovatum and kurabayashii) in bloom,10 species of fern, 6 of umbellifers,….. Is that enough temptation? We will shuttle cars to Lagoon Creek, where Highway 101 meets the ocean north of Klamath, and then start walking from the spectacular Requa trailhead on the north side of the mouth of the Klamath River. It's a 4-mile, gentle hike. We might visit Hidden Beach along the way. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or arrange a place farther north. Dress for being in the weather all day! Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. Please tell Carol you are coming 822-2015.

March 11, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

"Burning the Bald Hills: Managing Savanna and Woodland Ecosystems in Redwood National Park" with Eamon Engber, Interagency Fire Ecologist with Redwood National Park. A problem 100 years in the making, the suppression of fires in what is now Redwood National Park has caused park ecologists to undertake active management strategies to bring about positive changes for native plants and animals. We will explore oak woodland and serpentine ecosystems and discover the fire and non-fire alternatives used to achieve renewed native biodiversity. Issues the park is addressing include native conifer encroachment, small-tree mortality, and understory response to various treatments. Eamon will share how this management is tied to the proposed vegetation management projects in the Little Bald Hills serpentine pine savanna.

March 14, Saturday.

Flint Ridge Trail Day Hike. This trail in Redwood National Park just south of the mouth of the Klamath River will take us through majestic, upland old growth Redwoods, with blooms of Milkmaids, Smith's Fairy Bells, and Redwood Violets, as well as along the banks of Marshall Pond and through Red Alder-Sitka Spruce forest. The group will decide whether to do the full trail, 4.6 miles with 800 ft. elevation gain and loss, by shuttling vehicles, or do a shorter, up-and-back version. We will also check one of our favorite stands of Giant Purple Trillium along Klamath Beach Rd. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or arrange a place farther north. Dress for being in the weather all day! Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. Please tell Carol you are coming 822-2015 .

April 8, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.

"Northern California Botanical Rarities: what to look for, how to find them." The North Coast Chapter's territory includes home to many rare plants. CNPS Rare Plant Botanist and veteran botanical explorer Aaron Sims will impress you with how many, provide some current knowledge about them, and point out what we need to learn. He will introduce a few recently described rare species from northern California, as well as review some rare plants that have gone entirely unnoticed in recent decades. We will explore plants like Blue Creek Stonecrop (Sedum citrinum), Shy Monkeyflower (Erythranthe sookensis), Mountain Hairgrass (Vahlodea atropurpurea), and many more!

April 11-19 Native Plant Week.

Events related to native plants offered by CNPS and others

April 11, Sat. 9:00-12 noon.

Restoration at Trinidad State Beach. Pulling ivy! Wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Gloves and tools provided, or bring your own. Meet at the paved parking lot off Stagecoach Rd. 707-677-3109. A State Parks event.

April 11,Saturday, 10 a.m.-12 noon.

"Letting the Bay Back in: Experience a Salt Marsh Restoration," a walk at Freshwater Farms Reserve of the Northcoast Regional Land Trust. Join NRLT executive director Michael Cipra and Carol Ralph of California Native Plant Society to see if botanically invaded bottomlands can be restored to a tidal marsh of diverse native plants. Along the level, mowed path (3/4 mile) see thriving clumps of the rare Lyngby's Sedge and lush leaves of the dramatic Coastal Angelica; in the marsh see two species of arrowgrass, which is not a grass. Boots are not necessary, but advisable, as the grass may be wet. Meet at 10 a.m. at the farm stand by the Freshwater Farms barn, 5851 Myrtle Ave. For information call 822-2242.

April 11, Saturday, 2 - 3:30 p.m.

Plant Walk at Arcata Marsh. Join long-time Friends of Arcata Marsh docents Rich Ridenhour and Leslie Anderson, both authors of A Photographic Guide to 101 Common Plants of the Arcata Marsh & Wildlife Sanctuary (which you can buy at the Marsh Interpretive Center), for a walk to appreciate the common plants in this favorite outdoor area. Meet at 600 South G St., Arcata. 826-2359 arcatamarshfriends.org. Sponsored by Friends of Arcata Marsh.

April 12, Sun. 9:30-a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Restoration at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center. Friends of the Dunes. Meet at 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. 444-1397

April 12, Sunday, 1:00-3:00 p.m..

"Native vs Non-native Plants at the Edge of the Bay," a walk on Eureka's Hikshari Trail, presented by Humboldt Baykeeper and Hikshari Trail Stewards. Susan Penn will share plants, ecology, and local history along a 3/4-mile section of this level trail. Meet the succulent pickleweed, the dreaded poison hemlock, and the cheerful seaside daisy. Thanks to support from the California Coastal Conservancy, our staff and docents lead bilingual tours in Spanish and English. Meet at 1p.m. at the vista point at the end of Truesdale St. off south Broadway in Eureka. For more information: 707-825-1020 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or www.humboldtbaykeeper.org.

April 12. Sunday.

Horse Mountain or Prairie Creek Day Trip. Horse Mt. is often snow-covered in April. What are mountain plants doing when snow is lacking in April? If winter continues dry, we will find out! If the weather becomes wintry, we will go someplace lower elevation, probably a trail in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park to see trilliums. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for being in the weather all day! Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. For actual destination check the web site or call Carol, 822-2015 .

Apr. 12, Sunday, all day.

South Fork Trinity River Trail Hike. Much to see and hear on this perennial favorite National Forest trail off of Highway 299 just east of Willow Creek. Redbud, Baby Blue Eyes, Black-headed Grosbeak. Breathtaking vistas of the river’s gorge below, and trekking poles will be a plus. A profusion of wildflowers, especially since the 2008 Hell’s Half mosaic burn. No dogs. Dress for the day’s weather. Hikers must have water, lunch, sun/cold protection, good footwear, and some agility to cross a couple of small tributaries. Moderate difficulty, 6.5 miles, 500-1000 feet elevation change. Carpools: Meet 8:30 am at Ray’s shopping center in Valley West. A North Group Sierra Club outing. Leader Ned, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 825-3652. Heavy rain cancels.

April 12, Sunday. 2 p.m.

Old Town Native Plant Garden. Right there by the sidewalk and parking lot at Second H Streets, Eureka, you will find a diverse, interesting, and useful garden of native plants. Besides answering questions, garden creator Monty Caid of Lost Foods Nursery will talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 14, Tues. 10 a.m.-12 noon.

Volunteer work at the CNPS Nursery in Bayside. Meet at the Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd., 9:50 a.m.. 826-0259

April 14, Tuesday. 12 noon-1 p.m.

Native Plants in an Urban Garden in Arcata. See the native plants and the wildlife they harbor in the Arcata Community Center Native Plant & Wildlife Garden, a project of the North Coast Chapter of CNPS. Naturalist, gardener, and author Pete Haggard will be there to help you see and to answer questions. Walk from the Community Center up the path left of Healthsport, or walk down from 7th Street. 839-0307.

April 14, Tues. 2 p.m.

Lost Foods Native Plant Nursery and Sanctuary, Redwood Acres. Native plants have been thriving in this garden and nursery created by Monty Caid at the edge of the fairgrounds. He will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Find the nursery and sanctuary at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds in Eureka, 3750 Harris Street. Enter the fairgrounds at Gate #3 at the end of Harris Street and turn left and follow the road to the garden area. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 15, Wed. 2 p.m.

Ryan House Lost Foods Native Plant Sanctuary. Knowledgeable and experienced native plant gardener Monty Caid, of Lost Foods, created a native plant garden at this historic, Eureka house, 1000 E St. While you enjoy the attractive garden Monty will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 15, Wednesday. 7-9 p.m.

"Ocean Friendly Gardening and Native Plant Landscaping." Experienced designers, landscapers, and gardeners Lia Webb (GHD and Surfrider Foundation), and Eric Johnson (Samara Restoration) will introduce ecological landscape design principles that include Slow-the-Flow, Low Impact Development (LID), and Ocean Friendly Gardening, all with native plants in mind. The presentation will highlight how these concepts are applicable to a range of settings, climates, urban and rural, coastal and mountain regions. They will share local case studies including a parking lot stormwater treatment project and a commercial building LEED renovation. Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 443-8326

April 16, Thurs. 2 p.m. .

Lost Foods Native Plant Nursery and Sanctuary, Redwood Acres. Native plants have been thriving in this garden and nursery created by Monty Caid at the edge of the fairgrounds. He will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Find the nursery and sanctuary at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds in Eureka, 3750 Harris Street. Enter the fairgrounds at Gate #3 at the end of Harris Street and turn left and follow the road to the garden area. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 17, Fri. 11 a.m.

"The Importance of California Native Plants" by Monty Caid at the Eureka Sequoia Garden Club meeting. First Covenant Church, 2526 J St., Eureka. Bring lunch. 442-1387

April 18, Saturday. 10 a.m. start.

Salmon River Trail Wildflower Day Hike. We will walk along the road to Hippo Rock and continue along the trail for a total distance of about three miles there and back. Trail conditions can be uneven, but otherwise easy to moderate. Meet at the Panamnik building in Orleans (same building as the Post Office, 38150 Hwy 96) at 10 a.m. Please bring a lunch and water. Finish by mid-afternoon. Please contact Tanya Chapple at 530-627-3202 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

April 18, Saturday, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Native Plants in Yards and Forest. Join Carol Ralph for a walk from the Community Center to Arcata Community Forest and back to see native plants in private landscapes and in a redwood forest. Besides identification, questions like "What IS a native plant?" "Why plant natives in your yard?" "How do you mimic in a yard a wild, native habitat?" will be considered. Hopefully, trillium will be blooming in the forest. The walk is about 3 miles on sidewalks and good paths, with about 250 ft. elevation gain. Call 826-7050 to register for this free trip sponsored by California Native Plant Society at Godwit Days, or register for Godwit Days at www.godwitdays.org

April 18, Sat. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Patrick's Point State Park Earth Day Restoration Event. The eleventh annual work day to remove invasive, non-native plants such as English ivy. Refreshments and picnic lunch provided! Removing invasive plants is a moderate activity, and participants are encouraged to wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Gloves and tools are provided, but feel free to bring your own. Work locations are less than a half-mile hike from the meeting location. For more information please contact Michelle Forys at 707-677-3109 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

April 18, Sat. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Restoration at the Lanphere Dunes. Friends of the Dunes. Meet at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Rd., Arcata, to carpool. 444-1397

April 18, Sat. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Patrick's Point State Park Earth Day Restoration Event. The eleventh annual work day to remove invasive, non-native plants such as English ivy. Refreshments and picnic lunch provided! Removing invasive plants is a moderate activity, and participants are encouraged to wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Gloves and tools are provede, but feel free to bring your own. Work locations are less than a half-mile hike from the meeting location. For more information please contact Michelle Forys at 707-677-3109 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

April 18, Sat. 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Wildearth Garden. Donna Wildearth loves flowers and loves native plants. This passion plus her experience and thoughtful design have created an eye-catching and pleasing garden, which she is willing to share as part of this celebration of native plants. 2904 Williams St., Eureka. Garden Visions Landscape 707- 476-0273.

April 18, Sat. 2 p.m.  

Lost Foods Native Plant Nursery and Sanctuary, Redwood Acres. Native plants have been thriving in this garden and nursery created by Monty Caid at the edge of the fairgrounds. He will answer questions and talk about the many uses of the native plants there and the importance of growing and using native plants for food, medicine, and attracting and providing habitat for wildlife like birds, bees, and butterflies. Find the nursery and sanctuary at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds in Eureka, 3750 Harris Street. Enter the fairgrounds at Gate #3 at the end of Harris Street and turn left and follow the road to the garden area. Lost Foods is a local non-profit dedicated to restoring native plant diversity and abundance. 707-268-8447

April 19, Sunday. 12:00-3:30 p.m.

Godwit Days walk at Mal'el North. Join a Friends of the Dunes naturalist for a bird (and plant) walk at the Ma-le'l Dunes Unit of the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge as part of the Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival. Register through Godwit Days, godwitdays.org, (707) 826-7050.

April 25, Saturday. 10:00 a.m. to12 p.m.

Ferns of the Dunes. Ferns are distinctive and popular for the exotic texture they add to vegetation. Carol Ralph will introduce eight species of our common ferns in the easy setting at the riparian edge of the Lanphere Dunes and talk about some of the amazing aspects of fern life. Walking will be about 100 yards. Bring a hand lens. Meet at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road in Arcata and carpool to the protected site. Co-sponsored with Friends of the Dunes. Please register by calling 444-1397.

May 1-3, Friday through Sunday.

SPRING WILDFLOWER SHOW and NATIVE PLANT SALE at the Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Dr., Manila. An exciting, annual gathering of wildflowers (both native and non-native) and people who love them. The SHOW is open Friday 1-4 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Find details on the web stie. If you want to help, call Carol 822-2015 The NATIVE PLANT SALE is open Friday and Saturday only, 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.. Hundreds of volunteer- and nursery-grown native plants, chosen by our experienced gardeners to be good additions to local yards. They will be on hand to help you choose and answer your questions. Plant sales help fund our chapter! Volunteer help is always needed, to help grow plants and to help at the sale in many capacities. Anna 826-7247.

May 9, Saturday.

Flora of Snow Camp Mountain, Day Hike. Come explore the wild woods and streams of the Snow Camp Mtn. area. See for yourself why Joseph P. Tracy collected so many intriguing specimens from this enchanting landscape. Bianca Hayashi will lead a walk in some of the most beautiful, and floristically rich, areas of the Snow Camp Mtn. region on private Green Diamond Resource Company property. Have you had the chance to mingle with fawn lily or bunchberry? This may be your opportunity. Most hiking will be done off trail on this excursion, so sturdy hiking shoes will be necessary. Expect to hike as much as 1.5 miles in total. Expect to be outside for the day and bring layered clothing; Snow Camp is at approximately 4000 ft. in elevation. Bring water and a lunch. Driving out to Snow Camp will require 4WD vehicles, so carpooling will likely be necessary. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). We will return in the afternoon. Please let Carol know that you plan on attending 707-822-2015.

May 9, Saturday. 10 a.m. start.

Twin Lakes Wildflower Walk, Orleans area. We hope to catch the azalea bloom at Twin Lakes as well as investigate the other plants there. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans (same building as the Post Office, 38150 Hwy 96) at 10 a.m., or at the bottom of Slate Creek Rd at 10:30. Please bring a lunch and water. Finish by mid-afternoon. Please contact Tanya Chapple at 530-627-3202 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

May 13, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

"The Bigfoot Trail: A Celebration of Klamath Mountain Flora." The Bigfoot Trail travels 360 miles across the Klamath Mountains from the subalpine slopes of the Yolla Bolly-Middle Eel Wilderness to the temperate rainforest in Crescent City. Michael Kauffmann, the trail's originator, will take you on a photographic journey along the trail and celebrate both the common and rare plants along the way, including 32 species of conifers. To get ready for summer hiking, an updated map set and write-up for the route will be available with a portion of the proceeds going to North Coast CNPS! Visit www.bigfoottrail.org to preview the route.

May 14, Thursday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Tour the Lost Coast Brewery Native Plant Garden at the Humboldt Botanical Garden with volunteer curator Mark Moore. Since retiring from Calif. Fish & Game Mark has devoted his expertise and time to this garden. Site Manager Terri Kramer will be on hand also. This special tour is to encourage CNPS members to see the wonderful things that have been growing at the HBG. Bring a sack lunch to enjoy in the garden and plan to browse in other sections. Admission is free to members; you can join at the gate for $25 or $35. Admission for non-members is $5 (seniors) or $8. Admission fees help keep this non-profit alive! Find the garden at 707 Tompkins Hill Rd, Eureka. Turn at the North Entrance of the College of the Redwoods. 442-5139

May 16-17, Saturday-Sunday.

Shelter Cove and King Range Day Trip or Overnight. After attending a native plant workshop by the Lost Coast Interpretive Association in Shelter Cove, including a guided walk on the Shelter Cove Nature Trail, we will walk the Hidden Valley Trail (2.7 miles) before settling for the night at Wailaki Campground (or someplace civilized in Shelter Cove). Sunday morning we will hike the Chemise Mountain Trail (3.0 miles round trip), possibly adding all or part of the Chinquapin Loop Mid-afternoon we'll head for home. Tell Carol you are coming, to learn specific meeting places. 822-2015.

May 23, Saturday.

Two Azalea Reserves, Two Short Walks. State Parks holds two native plant treasures, two natural stands of Western Azaleas. We will visit both, hopefully blooming, to appreciate their beauty, fragrance, diversity, and associated habitat. We will walk the short loop trails at each reserve, with a stop in between for bring-your-own picnic lunch at the native plant garden at the Trinidad Museum. Meet at 10:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) to carpool; at 10:15 a.m. at the Azalea State Natural Reserve (McKinleyville); between 12 noon and 1 p.m. at the Trinidad Museum; or about 1:30 p.m. at the Stagecoach Hill (Kane Rd.) Azalea Reserve. It's good to tell Carol where you will meet us 707-822-2015. Where to find the reserves: Azalea State Natural Reserve: Exit onto North Bank Rd. off 101 just north of the Mad River; after about one mile turn left on Azalea Dr., and shortly after that, left into the parking lot. Two loops about half mile each. Stagecoach Hill Azalea Reserve: From 101 north of Big Lagoon, at mile-marker 112.5 turn right onto Kane Rd. (It's small!), then left at a junction, then follow the small road to a small parking area at the end under spruces.

June 6, Saturday. 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Jacoby Creek Forest Redwood Ecology Hike. Jacoby Creek Forest is normally closed to the public. This is a rare opportunity to survey its trees and plants. The walk is limited to 25 people. To make a reservation call 707-822-8184 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Meet at the parking lot behind City hall on 7th Street to carpool to the Jacoby Creek forest. Bring water, wear sturdy hiking shoes, be prepared for a moderate hike with two stream crossings. Offered by the City of Arcata.

June 6, Saturday. 9 a.m. start.

Haypress Meadow Wildflower Hike (& optional backpack overnight). Explore meadows of the western Marble Mountains. This is an all day hike with the option to backpack and camp overnight. Meet at the Panamnik Building in Orleans (same building as the Post Office, 38150 Hwy 96) at 9 a.m., or at the Stanshaw Trailhead at 10:30. Please contact Tanya Chapple at 530-627-3202 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Co-sponsored by Mid-Klamath Watershed Council.

June 20, Saturday.

Rare Plant Treasure Hunt--Trinity Monkeyflower (Erythranthe trinitiensis). Once again the North Coast Chapter of CNPS is partnering with Six Rivers National Forest to search for a rare plant. We will head up Highway 299 to about 4,000 ft elevation in the Horse Mountain Botanical Area of Six Rivers National Forest. We will visit a site where the recently described Trinity Monkeyflower was seen last year and then attempt of find additional occurrences in the vicinity. Be prepared for short hikes off gravel roads and for changeable, mountain weather. Bring boots, lunch, water, hats, and sunscreen. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) to carpool. Contact John McRae at 707-441-3513 for information, to say you are coming, and to tell him if you can bring a 4-wheel-drive vehicle.

June 27, Saturday.

Plant Gall Survey Trek. A search for interesting and diverse plant galls takes us back to Titlow Hill Rd. and Horse Mountain area in Six Rivers National Forest (off Highway 299) with naturalist John DeMartini. At various roadside stops we will wander a bit, inspecting especially oaks (Quercus spp.) for these amazing homes for certain insect larvae. We will make the most of the botany available, which should be wonderful. Be prepared for walking off-trail and for changeable, mountain weather (cold or hot). Bring lunch and plenty of water, and if you have one, a hand lens. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 9:30 a.m. to carpool. Return by 5 p.m. (or sooner, driver's choice). It's good to tell us you're coming: 822-2015

July 10-11-12, Friday p.m.-Sunday.

East Boulder Lake and Scott Mt. Summit. A two-mile hike, after an hour's drive from our camp will put us at 6,700 ft in the wide basin of East Boulder Lake in the Scott Mountains, south of Callahan. We will car-camp Friday and Saturday nights at Scott Mt. Summit Campground (5400 ft elevation) on Route 3 north of Weaverville, 3 hours from Arcata, in Shasta Trinity National Forest. Saturday we will maximize time at East Boulder Lake among the Western White Pine and alpine flowers. Sunday we will explore the camp area (one of our favorites) and Pacific Crest Trail before heading home. Important: tell Carol if you are thinking of coming! 822-2015 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

August 9, Sunday.

Pine Ridge Prairies Day Hike. "Prairies" and the oak woodlands mixed with them are two of our shrinking habitats, as lack of fires and reduced grazing allow conifers to grow, shading out a diverse mix of grasses and herbs, as well as the oaks. Many of our favorite sun-loving wildflowers thrive in these open habitats. A few may still be blooming when we explore the prairies of Pine Ridge, making use of new trails created by the Bureau of Land Management, Redwood Coast Mountain Bike Association, and the Humboldt Trails Council on this ridge in the BLM's Lacks Creek Management Area (north off Bair Rd., between Redwood Creek and Hoopa). We will hike about 4 miles. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). Dress for being in mountain weather all day. At elevation 3,600 ft. it can be hotter or colder than on the coast. Bring lunch and water. Return late afternoon. Carol 822-2015

September 8, Tuesday. 7:00 p.m.

Friends of the Dunes hosts "Ecology of Japanese Dunes" with Professor Yoshinori Kodama (geomorphologist) and Professor Dal Nagamatsu (plant ecologist). Tottori Prefecture is on the Sea of Japan on Honshu Island. Like our North Coast, the Tottori coast is rugged, tectonically active, and subject to high winds and strong storms. The Japanese scientists, including two graduate students, wish to compare similarities and differences in how dunes form and migrate and how dune plants respond to their ever-changing habitats. They also wish to learn how Americans manage our dune ecosystems. They and their American hosts will be visiting coastal dunes in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties during the week of September 7.

September 9, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.

"Tropical Fungi: New Insights from the Guiana Shield and Congo Basin." Dr. Terry Henkel, mycologist at Humboldt State University, will review his work in both Guyana (South America) and the Congo (Africa) exploring the world's largest areas of intact tropical forests to document new species of fungi and study their ecological relationships with green plants. His work surprised ecologists by finding on both continents that fungal diversity approached that of species-rich temperate forests. The discovery of forests dominated by pea family and dipterocarp family trees stimulated research into their ecology and mycology. Ectomycorrhizal relationships between fungi and trees emerged as important ecological forces. On this virtual tour of tropical forests Dr. Henkel will give us an appreciation of what we can't see under our feet as we appreciate the majesty and beauty of forests above our heads.

September 12, Saturday. 10 am-3 pm.

Native Plant Sale at the chapter nursery at Jacoby Creek Land Trust's Kokte Ranch, 2182 Old Arcata Rd, Bayside. Hundreds of native plants grown by our volunteers and three local native plant nurseries will be available. Experienced gardeners will help customers choose plants and will give brief talks about some of the plants on hand, half-hourly starting at noon. Fall is time to plant, and these plants are priced to sell. Native plants can lower your water use. Most are edible or useful in some way. They attract birds, butterflies, bees, and other native wildlife. And they are beautiful and interesting! For information see our web site www.northcoastcnps.org or call 707-822-2015 or 707-826-7257.

September 13, Sunday.

Elk RiverSpit Day Hike. Where there's water, there will be plants still green, maybe even blooming. And sand plants are hardy. Elk River Spit has salt water, fresh water, and sand, so we're sure to find something interesting. We will walk about 3 miles, mostly on firm sand, including crossing the river on a train tressel. Bring lunch and water; be prepared to be outside all day. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) to carpool, or at 9:45 at the Park & Ride at Herrick Ave exit at the south end of Eureka. Return mid- to late-afternoon. Tell Carol you're coming, in case plans change (weather): 822-2015.

September 26, Saturday.

Woody Plants and Galls on Horse Mountain, revised field trip. Late summer galls are remarkably scarce this year, but we can look again at the spring galls we found in June in the Titlow Hill Rd. and Horse Mountain area in Six Rivers National Forest (off Highway 299). Oaks, silktassel, manzanitas, and tobacco brush are popular hosts of the insects that produce galls, but we will look at anything botanically interesting among the diverse shrubs and trees in this nearby mountain area. Any flowers blooming this late will certainly get some attention. Be prepared for walking off-trail at various roadside stops and for changeable, mountain weather (cold or hot). Bring lunch and plenty of water. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 9:30 a.m. to carpool. Return by 5 p.m. Tell us you're coming, in case plans change: 822-2015

October 4, Sunday.

Tolowa Dunes Day, a field trip. We'll walk a trail in Tolowa Dunes State Park, Crescent City, comparing this dune forest, dune hollows, and dune mat with what we know from Humboldt Bay area. Probably we will visit some wetland plants along the lake. We might decide to help pull European Beach Grass with the Tolowa Dunes Stewards' restoration volunteers. We might also visit the sweeping coastal prairie on Point St. George and check the bluffs for succulents, mist maidens, and crowberry. And it's fun to stop at Whaler's Island in the harbor to see the hemlock parsley. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 8:30 a.m. to carpool, or arrange another place. Return late afternoon. Carol 822-2015.

October 14, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.

A Tolowa Coast Evening. Long-time Tolowa Dunes resident, nature writer, organizer, and advocate Susan Calla will present “The Tolowa Coast, a Liquid Landscape,” an overview of the diverse dune, wetland, lagoon, and shoreline habitats and species found within Tolowa Dunes State Park and the Lake Earl Wildlife Area in Del Norte County. Laura Julian, biotechnician at Redwood National and State Parks and leader of countless public walks and work parties in the Tolowa Dunes, studied the bees there. In her talk “Food Deserts and Invasive Plants, or, Where Can a Bee Find a Snug Bed and a Good Meal?" she will share some conclusions about the links between food, nest availability, and invasive plants.

November 7, Saturday.

Shrubs from Coast to Mountain. With no flowers to look for and with two new shrub books in hand, it's a good day to see how many species of shrubs we can find in one day while still having a good time. The route could include dune forest, Azalea State Reserve, Blue Lake Hatchery or Industrial Loop, Chezem Rd., Lord Ellis Summit, Vista Point, Berry Summit, Horse Mountain, and East Fork Willow Creek. We can decide as we go. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Meet at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd, Arcata) at 8:30 a.m. to carpool, or arrange another place. Return late afternoon. Carol 822-2015.

November 11, Wednesday. 7:30 p.m.

"Linneaus, God's Registrar." Carolus Linnaeus was the most famous scientist of his time. With the possible exception of Albert Einstein, no other modern figure comes close to the level of recognition that he enjoyed with the general public. His monumental works on plants and animals are the starting point of the nomenclature of these groups. Look through any technical flora or treatment of animals and you will soon encounter Linnaeus, L., or (L.) as part of a scientific name. He named literally thousands of plants and animals, which led to his being called "God's Registrar." But there is so much more to this fascinating, if not entirely admirable, individual. Dr. James P. Smith, Jr., Professor of Botany, Emeritus, at Humboldt State University will review Linnaeus' life, the intellectual environment in which he worked, and his varied contributions to science. Why did he stop practicing medicine? Why were some of his botanical works banned? Was he a creationist? And, did he actually develop the system of naming plants and animals that we still use today?

December 10, Wed. 7:30 p.m.

Native Plant Show and Tell. Join us for an informal evening sharing photos, artifacts, readings, or food relating to native plants and their habitats. Donna Wildearth will show a native meadow she designed to replace a lawn. Dave Imper will show a wildfire in the home of the Lassics Lupine, one of our rarest plants. Jim and Virginia Waters will show photos of their latest trip. And there might be others! If you would like to share something, contact Michael at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 707-407-7686.

CNPS CONVENES IN ARCATA

September 6-8, 2013

by Carol Ralph

CNPS is a non-profit federation, led by a Chapter Council composed of one delegate from each of the 33 chapters. The council meets four times each year to share information, to discuss and decide the overall direction of the organization, and to set policy. This fall, at our invitation, they are coming to Arcata.

The CNPS Board of Directors, which has the fiduciary and legal responsibility for CNPS and hires the Executive Director, come to these quarterly meetings, as does the Executive Director, who manages day-to-day operations, and do other staff.

Among the Chapter Council, CNPS board, and staff are some of the most committed and talented people you have ever met. You are invited to meet and interact with them during any activities at the September quarterly meeting, which is devoted mainly to conservation issues. Your participation is welcomed at both the board and chapter council meetings. Your interest, opinions, input, and questions are appreciated. This is your chance to find out about other chapters and state efforts, as well as to influence our organization's efforts.

Schedule:

Sept. 6, Friday evening. A get-together at an Arcata establishment for food, drink, socializing, and networking.   Sept. 7, Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. At Trinidad Town Hall, the Council conservation session, followed by more socializing, snacks, and beverages, then a catered dinner, and an after-dinner speaker.

Sept. 8, Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-12 noon. At Trinidad Town hall, Chapter Council considers other business. In the afternoon we offer our visitors field trips, which members are welcome to join. Destinations are yet to be decided.

We may offer additional field trips before and after the meeting. Additionally, while the delegates are busy in session, we may offer an activity or two specifically for North Coast Chapter members, led by CNPS staff from the Sacramento office.

As hosts, our chapter has some duties for which we need volunteer help, for example, staffing a registration table on Saturday morning, helping set up the meeting room early Saturday, maintaining the coffee and refreshment station through the day (in shifts), managing the projector and other equipment.   If you can help, please contact Carol (707-822-2015; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Check our web site (www.northcoastcnps.org) for details as they emerge, such as the speakers' identities, the field trip destinations, and the conservation topics on the meeting agenda.

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HOST A CNPSer!

As hosts we also help visitors find the accommodation of their choice, including private homes, B&B's, and motels. If you can offer a guest room in your house or a camping site by your house to a visiting delegate, board member, or staff, please contact Jen Kalt (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).   What a great chance to interact with interesting, knowledgeable people!

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2006 ACTIVITIES

  • Wednesday, January 11, 8pm - the monthly meeting features a slide show on conservation in the Klamath River corridor, presented by Michael Max Hentz. Max is an independent consultant with a background in botany and natural resource ecology. Prior to the fish kill, he made a 40 day, 400 mile trip down the river, from Sycan Marsh in Oregon to the Pacific Ocean at Requa. Mike will share his photographs, and discuss river and upland management practices and opportunities.
    The program is preceded by a business meeting at 6:30. All are welcome, and there is no charge. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. For more information call Tamara at 707-677-3142.
  • Wednesday, February 8, 8pm - slide show, "Planning for Locally Rare Species" and communities, many of which are not currently regulated by the state or federal government. Elizabeth Chattin of the Ventura County Planning Division will describe the steps taken by her agency to help protect these resources.
    The program is preceded by a business meeting at 6:30. All are welcome, and there is no charge. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. For more information call Tamara at 707-677-3142.
  • Saturday, February 25 - "Coastal Trail Day Hike". The easy, 4- mile trail along the bluff between Requa, on the north side of the mouth of the Klamath River, and Lagoon Creek, where 101 meets the ocean north of Klamath, has some early spring treats, like huge gooseberries festooned with red flowers, masses of dainty violets, and mats of unfurling false lily-of-thevalley. Hope for one of those glorious February days, dress for the weather, bring lunch and water. We'll return by dark. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). We will shuttle a car to the north end of the hike, so we'll only have to walk one way. Call Carol Ralph (822-2015) to say you are coming or to arrange another meeting place.
  • Sunday, February 26, 1 pm - Early Spring plant walk in Trinidad, featuring fetid adder's tongue, skunk cabbage, milkmaids, coltsfoot, etc. Trinidad State Beach, in town off Stagecoach Road. Larry Levine, 822-7190.
  • Wednesday, March 8, 8pm - "Going Native - Landscaping with Ecological Integrity," Peigi Duvall, CNPS statewide horticulture program director for CNPS. Peigi is certified in Landscape and Ornamental Horticulture, and professionally designs native gardens throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.

Landscaping is found everywhere we live, work, shop, and travel. Many of these planted areas require large amounts of water, and often much maintenance work and regular application of fertilizer, and pesticides. Using native California plants helps conserve resources, reduces the need for labor and chemicals, and still lets us create beautiful landscaping.

The program is preceded by a business meeting at 6:30. All are welcome, and there is no charge. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. 707-822-7190.

  • Saturday, March 18 - "Myrtle Creek Day Hike". This 2-mile roundtrip trail off highway 199 in the Myrtle Creek Botanical Area of the Six Rivers National Forest was a traditional spring destination of our chapter for many years. Vegetation includes coastal redwood, serpentine slopes and seeps, nparian, mixed evergreen forest, and colonizers after mining. We might see goldthread (Coptis laciniata) and Trillium rivale blooming at this early date. Let's leave promptly at 8:30 a.m. from Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata), ready for the weather, with lunch and water packed. We'll return by dark. Call Carol Ralph (822-2015) to say you are coming or to arrange a more northern meeting place. (Depending on time, some of us might do another trail on the way home.)
  • Wednesday, April 12, 7 pm - Speaker Phyllis Gustafson, co-author of a new book, Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest.
    (mixer 7pm - program 7:30) No charge - everyone is welcome. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. 707-822-2015.
  • Wednesday, April 19, 7 pm - Business meeting, all are welcome. North Coast Environmental Center, on H St. two blocks south of Arcata Plaza. 822-2015.
  • Saturday, April 22 COASTAL DRIVE - SPRING FLORA AND VEGETATION SAMPLING. Coastal Drive winds for about five miles south of the mouth of the Klamath River to the Newton B. Drury Parkway. In addition to stands of large Sitka spruce we'll visit coastal scrub, coastal prairie, and sample an alder woodland stand. There will be plenty of wildflowers, fantastic ocean views, and an historical stop or two along the way. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata). We'll return late afternoon. Call Tony LaBana (441-2098) to say you are coming or to arrange another meeting place.
  • Sunday April 30, 1 pm - Wildflower walk in grand fir forest near Hydesville, hosted by landowners Bill and Linda Shapeero. This small property has more species than you'll find along the trails in most public preserves. From Eureka, take 101 south past Fortuna to a left at Drake Hill Road, then right at Rohnerville Road, 1.7 miles to Puddin Lane (bottom of gulch). Follow signs to Shapeero. The ground may be damp, so bring boots or old shoes. For information call 822-7190 or 768-3287
  • Friday-Sunday, May 5-7 - annual SPRING WILDFLOWER SHOW and native plant sale at Manila Community Center.
  • Wednesday, May 10, 7pm - speaker Bob Case of California Invasive Plants Council and CNPS Invasives Committee. Bob will explain how members of the public trained in weed identification can participate in a new statewide "Early Detection and Rapid Response" system for eradicating plant pests. (Bob is also a skilled and prolific wildflower photographer.)
    (mixer 7pm - program 7:30) No charge - everyone is welcome. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. 707-822-2015.
  • Sunday May 14, 10 am - Salt marsh and dunes walk at the Eureka Wildlife Sanctuary, featuring the rare Humboldt Bay owls's clover and more. Meet at the Park-and-Ride lot, west side of Hwy. 101 at Elk River Road, the first exit south of Eureka. Led by Larry Levine and other members of CNPS (822-7190).
  • Wednesday, May 17, 7pm - Business meeting, all are welcome. Northcoast Environmental Center, on H St. two blocks south of Arcata Plaza. 822-2015.
  • Saturday, May 20 - Grasshopper Peak Dayhike and Plant Survey. In return for a lift to the top of Grasshopper Peak in Humboldt Redwoods State Park (a 7 mile hike), we will create for the park plant lists of all we find in this area that was burned by the Canoe Creek Fire two years ago. Lots of surprises have popped up in this chaparral and grassland above the Douglas fir forest. The more eyes we have, the more we will find; you don't have to be an expert to be helpful. Walking down the mountain is an option, if we have time and energy, or we can ride down. Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Departing from Arcata by 8:30 a.m. You must reserve a space by calling Carol Ralph (822-2015). Space may be limited, so first- call, first-served.
  • Saturday, June 3 - Berry Summit Wildflower Art And Walk. We'll look for a florific piece of the mountain along Forest Highway 1 to explore on foot and, for about an hour, to sit and draw. Rick Tolley will provide materials, if you need them, and as much instruction as you want. Come prepared for mountain weather (anything from hot to cold); bring a lunch and water. Return by late afternoon. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata), at 8:45 a.m. at Murphy's Market on Glendale in Blue Lake, or at 9:15 a.m. at the beginning of Titlow Hill Rd. at Berry Summit on Highway 299. Call Rick Tolley (668-5370) or Carol Ralph (822-2015) to say you are coming or for information.
  • Sunday June 11, 10 am - "Trinidad Head Wildflowers and History," our joint walk with the Trinidad Museum Society. Meet 10 am at the beach parking lot. After the walk, participants can link-up with the lighthouse tour or return to town for the annual "Fish Feed" celebration. 822-7190 or 677-0716
  • Sunday June 18, 10 am - Wildflowers, ferns, and trees of the Arcata Community Forest. We'll also be watching out for invasive exotics. Meet at the Trail #9 parking lot (near the tank), opposite the 700 block of Fickle Hill Road (aka "Park Ave.") (822- 7190).
  • Saturday, June 24 - Titlow Hill Day Hike. Come explore a private property that spans elevations from 1,500 to 3,000 ft above sea level between Titlow Hill and Redwood Creek, accessed off Titlow Hill Rd. off Rte. 299. What a treat! Riparian forest along creeks, oak woodland, grassland, and Douglas fir-madrone forest. The owners want to know what plants they have, so we'll make them a list. It will be a long one! We can mosey around on dirt roads or tramp cross country. Dress for a day outside in the mountains; bring lunch and water. We'll return by dark. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or 9:00 a.m. at Berry Summit. Please tell Carol (822-2015) that you are coming.
  • Friday-Monday, July 7-10 (all or part) - Cook And Green Pass and Environs ... join a field trip sponsored by CNPS Yerba Buena Chapter (SF), and cosponsored by California Horticultural Society, Western Chapter North American Rock Garden Society. details
  • Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16 - Lily Heaven Driving Tour, optional camp-out. Six or seven taxa of Lilium, plus hybrids, are possible in these wonderful mountains of Six Rivers National Forest, along with serpentine flora, rare plants, exeptional Port Orford cedar stands, Brewer spruce, and mountain meadows. Need I say more? Led by Lilyman, David Kim Imper. Saturday meet at 9:30 a.m. at the intersection of Forest Service Rd. 13N01 (FS rte 13) (7 miles north of Weitchpec on Rte 96) and Fish Lake Rd. This is 2 hours from Arcata, so some of us may camp Friday night at Fish Lake. Our route goes out FS 13, and Saturday night some of us will camp our there somewhere. Sunday will have another meeting place, to be decided later, and we might proceed as far as Flint Valley. Return Sunday evening (but you can leave any time). Dress for mountain weather; bring lots of food and water, your camping gear (if you're camping), and your map. You need to let us know you're coming! Carol Ralph (822-2015) or Dave Imper (444-2756).
  • Saturday, July 22, 10 am - 4 pm - Wildlife and Native Plant Garden Tour co-sponsored with Redwood Region Audubon. Featuring over 10 distinctive gardens from Eureka to McKinleyville designed with north coast nature in mind, this event is a popular among those looking for inspiration on gardening with native plants. The tour also helps raise funds for both CNPS and the Redwood Region Audubon Society.

    Tickets are $15 each and must be purchased in advance. By mail (before July 11), send a check payable to RRAS (Redwood Region Audubon Society) to Frances Madrone, 2568 Knox Cove Drive, McKinleyville, CA 95519.
    Starting July 1, tickets can be purchased at these locations:

Freshwater Farms, 5851 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka
The Garden Gate, 905 H Street, Arcata
Mad River Gardens, 3384 Janes Road, Arcata
Miller Farms, 1828 Central Avenue, McKinleyville
Northcoast Environmental Center, 575 H Street, Arcata
Pierson's Garden Shop & Nursery, 4100 Broadway, Eureka
Strictly For The Birds, 123 F Street, Eureka
Sun, Rain, Time, 518 Henderson Street, Eureka

To volunteer, call Carol Ralph, 822-2015. Additional info: Louise Bacon-Ogden, 445-8304 or Jennifer Tompkins, 443-6959.

  • Sunday, August 6 - Lassics Dayhike, Wilderness Walk, Art Outing, and optional overnight. CNPS joins with the California Wilderness Coalition to explore the Lassics Botanical Area and the adjacent Mt. Lassic proposed wilderness area. We will hike two short trails, to the tops of two peaks. The air is invigorating; the views are studpendous; the geology is impressive; the plants are hardy, unique, and rare. We will learn about the plants and the plans to protect the wilderness. PLUS, Rick Tolley will be there, art paper and pencils in hand, to organize an art session with anyone who wants to draw. We will be at 4,000-5,000 ft.above sea level. It can be hot or chlly. Bring food and LOTS of water. NO facilities or free water. Plan to return evening. Meet at 8:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata), 8:30 at the MacDonald's end of the Bayshore Mall parking lot, or 10:00 at Dinsmore Store on highway 36. From there it is about 1/2 hour. OR join some of us camping up there Saturday night. If you are coming, phone Dave (707)826-2790 or Carol (822-2015). If you are camping, phone Carol. Questions about art, phone Rick (668- 5370).
  • Saturday, August 12, 9 am to 5 pm - "Wetland Soils Workshop: A Primer On Their Identification, Description, And Genesis," co-sponsored by the CNPS Northcoast Chapter, Natural Resource Conservation Service, and California Department of Fish and Game. Charge. details
  • Saturday, August 12 - Sugar Creek Research Natural Area Day Trip - sponsored by CNPS Shasta Chapter. Sugar Creek Research Natural Area, Klamath National Forest, is one of the world's leading areas for coniferous diversity, we should see about 15 species on a gradual climb of about 2.5 miles to Sugar Lake. Further exploring above the lake is exciting, but optional depending on the group. In addition to conifers, we should expect to see the limited Trillium ovatum ssp. oettingeri (Salmon Mtn wakerobin) in fruit, and Allotropa virgata (sugarstick). Meet at the gravel parking lot on the north side of the Forest Service Office in Fort Jones (jct. of Hwy3 and Scott River Road) at 9:30 am for caravaning to trailhead. Parking at trailhead is limited. Bring the usual: lunch, water, bug juice, sunscreen etc. For more information, call Marla Knight, (530) 468-1238.
  • Friday-Sunday, September 8-10 - Annual CNPS Conservation Conference, Manila Community Center - The policy-making body of CNPS, the "Chapter Council," meets four times a year at different locations around the state. The September meeting is considered more important than the others, because it also serves as the annual CNPS "Conservation Conference". This year is North Coast Chapter's turn to host this special event. Activities will include the main Chapter Council session and Conservation Conference, statewide committee meetings, the Board of Directors meeting, and field trips. Many activities are open to the public and are free (excluding meals). This is a great opportunity to meet the CNPS statewide staff, officers, and Board members, and to share experiences with CNPS members from around the state. For more information, to help with planning and hosting the event, or to help house the visiting delegates, contact Larry Levine 822- 7190. Invitation (TXT 2KB), Council agenda (PDF 5KB), Conservation agenda (PDF 7KB) [8/31]
  • Wednesday, September 13, 7 pm - "Super-tree relicts in time: the natural history of monodominant forests of the Guiana Shield," Dr. Terry Henkel, Humboldt State University.

"Why do a few lowland tropical forests have one dominant tree species, rather than the hundreds we consider more typical? Dr. Henkel will discuss the causes and consequences of monodominance in recently discovered forests of the remote, unspoiled Guiana Shield region of northeastern South America"

Mixer 7 pm - program 7:30. No charge - everyone is welcome. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. 707-822-2015.

  • Saturday and Sunday, September 16, 17 - North Coast Chapter fall native plant sale. Northcoast Environmental Center, 575 H Street, Arcata. Saturday 10 am to 6 pm, Sunday 10 am to 4 pm. 839-1980.
  • Saturday, September 23 - Wetland Exploration. A great variety of wetland plants have colonized the former bed of the Mad River north of the new mouth. We will explore this area, from Murray Rd. to Vista Point (about 1 mile), with forays up Widow White Creek or out to the beach if we want. Good grass and other monocot ID practice! Bring lunch and water, wind breaker; consider wading shoes or boots. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or at 9:20 at the west end of Murray Rd., McKinleyville. We'll return mid- afternoon. Questions: Carol Ralph 822-2015.
  • Wednesday, October 11, 7 pm - October 11. (This meeting is also a chance to vote for chapter officers.) Lori Hubbart, landscaper, horticulturist, past CNPS state president, current president of the Dorothy King Young Chapter (Mendocino to Fort Bragg) will talk on "California Habitat Gardens for Wildlife and People." A garden can be more than a pretty place or backdrop for human activities. Native plants can help bring drama, insight and a sense of adventure to the home landscape. Idigenous plants suited to the North Coast and the right structural elements can make all the difference. Gardens can be a haven for birds, butterflies, reptiles and small mammals, while providing emotional sustenance for people.
    (mixer 7 pm - program 7:30) No charge - everyone is welcome. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. 707-822-2015.
  • Saturday, October 21 - "Dolason Prairie Dayhike". The diverse habitats along the Dolason Prairie Trail in Redwood National Park are sure to offer a touch of fall color somewhere, and possibly early mushrooms and wildlife surprises. From the trailhead on Bald Hills Rd. to the Tall Trees trailhead, about 6 miles, mostly downhill, we will pass through prairie, oak woodland, mixed woodland, redwood forest, and riparian forest. Western burning bush and dogwood are good bets for color. Dress for the weather and hiking; bring lunch and water. Meet at 8:30 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata) or elsewhere if you arrange it. Return by dark. Please tell Carol (822-2015) you are coming, so we can plan the shuttling between the two trailheads.
  • Wednesday, November 8, 7pm - "Monocot Treasures of Northwestern California: trilliums, irises, fairy bells and more." Dr. Michael Mesler, pollination biologist at Humboldt State University
    (mixer 7pm - program 7:30) No charge - everyone is welcome. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union. 707-822-2015.
  • Sunday, November 12 "Grizzly Creek State Park Dayhike". We usually drive right by this tiny park along the Van Duzen River. Let's find out what's in its "exceptional grove of coast redwood" and along all 4.5 miles of its trails (and maybe off trail?). Dress for the weather; bring lunch and water. Wading the shallow river is necessary to reach one trail. Meet at 9:00 a.m. at Pacific Union School (3001 Janes Rd., Arcata), 9:30 a.m. at the Mervyn's end of the Bayshore Mall parking lot, or about 10:00 a.m. at the park. Return by dark. Info: Carol, 822-2015.
  • Wednesday, December 13, 7 p.m. - Members Night (everyone welcome) - Talented local photographers will share some of their favorite native plant pictures: Alan Justice (Del Norte unusual plants), Dave Imper (endangered species), Pete Haggard (his garden), Jim and Virginia Waters (possibly mushrooms), Ron Johnson (CNPS field trip highlights). 677-0147.
    (mixer 7 p.m. - program 7:30) No charge - everyone is welcome. Arcata Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road near 7th and Union.
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